Browning Defender 850 WiFi Trail Camera Operation

So I've been playing with the new Defender 850 trail cameras lately.  I thought I would share some of the things I have found that might help you get the most out of your Browning trail camera.

The option to connect to these cameras via an app on your phone or tablet is pretty geeky cool. I like this function most for going through the setting and using the live preview to point the camera in the perfect direction. Here's how the app connecting process works.

With the power on turned on the camera, you then open the Browning Defender app on your phone. The trail camera is always using low power Bluetooth so when you turn on the Defender App it will either automatically connect via Bluetooth or you will have to select the Bluetooth camera name and then press the connect button.

Once you have this Bluetooth connection established you then can click the "BLU <> WIFI" button to switch the camera into wifi mode. At this point be a little patient as it may take a few seconds for your phone to see the trail camera in your available wifi's to connect to. Once the wifi shows up select to connect to it and then hit the back button on your Android phone (not sure what the iPhone people do). Now you will have a wifi connection to the phone and can use the Live View, Playback and Settings options. Pretty simple.

In the video below you can see how the live preview works. This is nice to point the camera where you want it, walk past it and see how critters would frame up in the view and adjust the camera position as needed.

Restoring MOA Accuracy To A Fouled Barrel

While setting up my new 28 Nosler, Browning X-Bolt rifle, it started shooting like a house of fire right out of the chute and then accuracy started to get increasingly degraded. Here is the process I used and how I found adding an extra step to my cleaning process restored my accuracy. 

After getting my new rifle I thoroughly cleaned the bore with a Bore Tech Eliminator and Kroil as I have with all my firearms in the past.

For my first outing to the range I had 10 rounds loaded up with H-1000 powder. The first shot was to verify the point of impact from bore sighting using the simple look down the bore technique. Then I had three different powder charges for three shots a piece. All three of these three shot groups shot sub MOA with one grouping at 3/8" at 100 yards. Awesome! That was quick, however I needed to shoot more to verify it would be consistently accurate.

Trip two to the range I shot two more three shot groups at 100 yards with the tightest load from the first trip to the range. The first group was just over an inch and the second was back under an inch at 7/8" and I shot a third three shot group at 300 yards that was five inches with a flier to the right. Not so good. Hmm...

My third trip I shot three, three shot groups again at 100 yards and all three groups were in the 1 1/2" to 2" range. Ahh!!! Opening up even more. This was when it clicked that I had to be having fouling problems. 

I tried my usual cleaning process of Kroil and Bore Tech Eliminator. And headed back to the range again this time to shoot a ladder test at 300 yards with different powder charges incrementally in 0.2 grains. On this trip I found a couple powder charge nodes with the best node being right where I had been loading my favorite load from the very first day. However the ladder wasn't as tight as I would have like it to be and the theme of fliers going to the right was continuing. Ahh!!!

Ok, I was convinced that there was an issue with the barrel fouling and discussed the issue with my engineer friend. He recommended JB Bore paste. As I learned, sometimes a new rifle bore needs a little polishing with a mild abrasive to smooth out any imperfections that persist from the factory. I have heard of this working awesome on barrels in the past but have been very nervous about taking any kind of abrasive to my rifle bores. My X-Bolt has a chrome line bore and I wondered how the JB Bore paste would work. My friend confirmed that it would work great with the chrome lined bore.

So here are the three things I run through my bore on cloth patches. The first item is Kroil that is an oil I like that will penetrate, help lift carbon and other debris in the bore. Second, Bore Tech Eliminator is an awesome chemical process that breaks down the copper. You can leave it in the barrel and it won't harm your barrel like an ammonia based Barnes CR2 cleaner would. Third is JB Bore Paste, which is my new addition to my cleaning process. JB Bore paste that is a mechanical process that scrubs and polishes the bore.

So before my next trip to the range I used a combination of Kroil, Bore Tech Eliminator and JB Bore paste. I would run patches of Bore Tech Eliminator from the chamber and out the muzzle followed by dry patches. After this I would run a patch of JB Bore paste except with the JB Paste I would stroke the patch back and forth in the barrel for around 10 times. I would then follow with a couple dry patches and then repeat the process with using the combination of the chemical and then mechanical cleaning agents.

After I had repeated the process 10 times my chemical patches were only a very, very faint blue color. Blue is the color your patch will be when it reacts with copper. A couple dry patches and a Kroil patch to finish it off and I was ready to head back to the range.

On this trip to the range I wanted to test a couple things at 300 yards. First I wanted to try a group with the original H-1000 load and then I wanted to try Retumbo powder ladder. So I first shot a fouling shot at a clay pigeon I had sat out at 300 yards and I drilled it. Cool! Immediately after that I shot three shots with the H-1000 load. Bingo. These three shots made a 2 1/8" group that measured only 1" vertically. And the one "flier" for the group was to the left instead of the right which at 300 yards the varying wind speed can easily effect. Even at that, this is the equivalent of a group under 3/4" at 100 yards. This is right at the size of groups I was getting with the load at 100 yards previous to the JB Bore paste cleaning. 

Right after firing this group I started on my Retumbo ladder test. Holy crap the first two shots of the ladder were near touching at 300 yards and the velocity and point of impact is the same for the H-1000 load I had just shot. That's awesome! In this ladder test there were two three shot sub MOA nodes. The overall group from the ladder was three inches narrower that the previous  (non-JB Bore Paste cleaned) ladder with the same light wind conditions.

Next trip I'm going to shoot some Retumbo loads in the tight 1 and 2 shots powder charges from my ladder test. And I think I will clean the barrel again but only run a couple JB Bore paste patches this time.

I'm hooked, JB Bore Paste is now going to be a part of my cleaning process. I can think of a couple other rifles I would like to use it in that have had group sizes getting a little larger than I would like. Hmm...

Rifle bore cleaning products

 

Out shooting a ladder test tonight with Hodgdon H1000 powder behind a 175 Gr ELD-X in my 28 Nosler. I'm not a pro at ladder tests, nor is this the tightest ladder I have shot, but I do like doing them to narrow down a solid accurate powder charge. For this ladder test I had 13 loads in 2 tenth increments from 76.6 Gr to 79 Gr holding on the same target at a distance of 300 yards. The idea is to find a node of consecutive shots that have the least variance in elevation. Shots 10 through 13 are only 1 1/4" apart in elevation and 11 through 13 are only 5/8" apart. 12 and 13 only 1/4" apart. Would be nice to see a 14 but this is getting near the max charge I feel comfortable with. Charge number 12 looks to be the best from this ladder. After a thorough cleaning and probably some JB bore paste to smooth out this new bore I am going to try a Retumbo ladder test next. #laddertest #28nosler #browning #chrony #targetshooting #rifle #whatgetsyououtdoors #hornady #hodgdon #loadyourown #reloading #reload

A post shared by Brady Smith (@diyhntr) on

 

Last night's 300 yard ladder test with different powder charges using Retumbo and a 2 1/8" 3 shot group with H-1000. Both were shot with my @browningfirearms X-Bolt 28 Nosler with @hornady_mfg 175 Gr ELD-X bullets. I first shot the 3 shot group (bottom target) with a load of H-1000 from a node in my previous ladder test. I then shot the ladder test. There are two sub moa nodes in this ladder. 1,2,3 and 9,10,11. I really like that 1 and 2 have the exact point of impact as the H-1000 group I had just finished shooting. And the velocities are both right at 3,215 for both loads. I'm getting closer to figuring out a favorite load. #xbolt #browning #whatgetsyououtdoors #reloading #reload #hodgdon #loadyourown #eldx #bullet #targetshooting #28nosler

A post shared by Brady Smith (@diyhntr) on

Landen's First Elk — Cow Elk Hunting with a Rogue 36 Pack Wheel

With Dallen and myself filling our cow elk tags it was time to help Landen.

Early in the morning on a week day my three boys and myself were up getting ready to help Landen fill his cow elk tag. Getting three boys all equipped and ready for cold temps with snow took an hour longer than I anticipated. It was a week day but as we pulled into the parking lot to access the public land my ears were correct as we found a horse trailer and three other vehicles. Darn it.

We started glassing from the parking lot spotting a cow out on a ridge near the area the cow elk that Dallen and I first spotted our cows the week before. We were just about ready to start the hike up after this elk when we watched three horses come in below the elk. I snapped a couple photo of these hunters just before they dropped the cow and another cow that was out of sight from us.

As it turned out the hunters with the horses were two friends of mine that work with me at Browning. They were excited to see the photo I snapped of them.

We glassed another group of cows three miles in and on the move to private ground. We could see some hunters in a basin I like to hunt working on a cow they had down. Hmm...

With all of the activity in the area ahead of us we decided to hike up a ridge line and then swing around below the other hunters looking for some cows that we had seen from the road while driving in that morning.

After a mile or so, with a few hours of hiking we dropped over into a small draw and below us were two cows. We worked our way down a ridge line out of sight of the elk and then popped up on a small cliff. I set a day pack on the cliff and Landen setup with my little A-Bolt Stainless Hunter Laminate in 243 WSSM, shooting 80 gr Tipped Triple Shock bullets.

As the two elk moved out in to the open 130 yards across from us Landen hammered the larger of the two with a perfect shot through the shoulders. Nice shooting Landen! The 80 Gr TTSX is a lightning bolt on deer and elk offering amazing penetration and trama is shoulder shot deer and elk out to 400 yards with my 243 WSSM handload going 3,550 fps in this little A-Bolt rifle.

When we got over to the elk we found that it was a calf. I thought it was a younger cow at first but once on the ground we found it was just a large calf with plenty of nice tender meat. Yum!

Dallen and I had already taken a couple nice sized cows the week before so we were set on meat for another year. Yes, our family goes through two elk a year on average. We love elk meat. Landen's elk may not have been the largest on the mountain but it has been a tasty one and given him some great experience to be better prepared on future hunts.

After a few pics with Landen's first elk we went to work boning it out and placing the meat into canvas breathable Pack Wheel Meat Panniers. After we had the meat all boned out and strapped on the Pack Wheel we only had a couple hundred yards to go to drop down to a road and then we could follow the road about a mile back to the parking lot for a very easy pack out with Rogue 36 Pack Wheel.

We even had a little daylight left for some pics on the way off the mountain. 

Another awesome time spent with my boys. Good shooting Landen!

Cow Elk Pack Out with Rogue 36 Pack Wheel

Subcategories

  • Big Game Hunting

    Journal entries from hunting mule deer, elk and whitetail deer.  You'll find hunts with 243 WSSM and 270 WSM rifles to muzzleloader and archery hunts.

  • General Hunting and Shooting

    Journal entries covering general information related to hunting and shooting. Many of these journal entries are from shooting on the rifle or archery range. There are also entries related to my experiences with the 243 WSSM, rifles, optics and other equipment and products I use.

  • Varmint Hunting

    Journal entries from hunting coyotes, rock chucks, prairie dogs and the like with 243 WSSM and 223 Rem. rifles.

  • Backpacking and Camping

    Backpacking, Pack Wheel camping and other camping adventures.

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